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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-37

Construct validity and factor analysis of the Gujarati version of the fear-avoidance beliefs questionnaire


Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, Sarvajanik College of Physiotherapy, Rampura, Surat, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Dibyendunarayan Dhrubaprasad Bid
Department of Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy, Sarvajanik College of Physiotherapy, Rampura, Surat - 395 003, Gujarat
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/PJIAP.PJIAP_11_18

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BACKGROUND: Although commonly used, no reports exist on the testing of the construct validity and factor analysis of the Gujarati version of the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ-G). STUDY DESIGN: This is an observational prospective study. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to assess the construct validity and factor analysis of the Gujarati version of the FABQ. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Item analysis, factor analysis, and construct validity were done with 128 chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients. Convergent and divergent validity (Pearson's correlation) was assessed by comparing FABQ-G to Numerical Pain Rating Scale, pressure pain threshold, Central Sensitization Inventory-Gujarati (CSI-G), Roland–Morris Disability Questionnaire-Gujarati (RMDQ-G), trunk flexors endurance, and trunk extensors endurance in CLBP patients. Potential ceiling and floor effects and prediction power were measured along with internal and external responsiveness of FABQ. Results: This study shows a three-factor model for FABQ-G. The convergent validity of the FABQ-G was supported by the pattern of correlations with the RMDQ-G (r = 0.514 and P < 0.000) and CSI-G (r = 0.455 and P < 0.000) in our study. The divergent validity was seen by negative correlation or no correlation with trunk flexors and extensors endurance (r = −0.266 and P < 0.002). No ceiling and floor effects were detected in the questionnaire. The FABQ showed good prediction power and responsiveness in both internal and external responsiveness analyses. Conclusion: The reasonable validity of the three-factor FABQ-G shown in this study makes it appropriate for the clinical use with Gujarati CLBP patients.


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